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Faculty

William Ryan Force

Assistant Professor of Sociology | Director of minor in Women's & Gender Studies
Education:
PhD, University of Missouri (2011)
MA, University of South Florida (2005)
BA, University of South Florida (2003)
Office: Herman 200 G
Website: http://WilliamRyanForce.com
(413) 782-1714

My research program emphasizes the accomplishment of identity at the intersection of culture, language, and power. I have published the following:

"Toward a Cryptoscience." Forthcoming chapter in The Supernatural in History, Society, and Culture (edited by Dennis Waskul and Marc Eaton; 2018; Temple University Press). My chapter articulates an argument for the academic exploration of the supernatural, providing a framework through which various supernatural topics are considered.

“Trick-or-Treating.” Chapter in Popular Culture as Everyday Life (edited by Dennis Waskul and Phillip Vannini; 2015, Routledge Press). This essay considers gift-giving as a micro-political technology of identity construction.

“Consumption Styles and the Fluid Complexity of Punk Authenticity" in Symbolic Interaction (2009; vol. 32, issue 4). An ethnographic study of the construction and maintenance of punk identity.

“The Code of Harry: Performing Normativity in Dexter” in Crime, Media, Culture (2010; vol. 6, issue 3). A theoretical analysis of identity performance in the TV series Dexter.

In addition to my teaching, I coordinate Safe Space training on campus and direct the Women's & Gender Studies minor. I am also pleased to act as the faculty advisor for the student organization Feminists Unite! (https://twitter.com/WNEFeminists).

CURRICULUM VITAE
INTERESTS

Theory, Gender and Sexuality, Identity, Popular Culture, Postmodernism, Semiotics, Social Control, Sociology of Everyday Life, Subculture

COURSES TAUGHT

Introduction to Sociology

Gender

Race & Ethnicity

Sociology of Religion

Culture & Subculture in the US & UK

Qualitative Methods

Deviance

Sociology of Culture

Anarchy & Society

Goffmania!

Professional Seminar

Power in Everyday Life

Protest Musics

The State v. The People

First Year Seminar