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Course Schedules and Descriptions

List of Courses: Fall2017

Code Courses are currently sorted by course number in descending order Name Courses are not currently sorted by course number
LAW 500 Introduction to the Law [Details]
LAW 500 Description

Introduction to the Law is a one-credit course required in the first year for all entering students, offered prior to the beginning of the first term, and graded on a pass-fall basis. This class introduces students to the study of law. It is designed to give students the knowledge and skills that will enable them to get the most out of their other first-year courses. The goals of the course include introducing students to the purposes and pedagogy of law school, providing techniques and strategies for learning the law, and providing information on background concepts. Students will gain an understanding of the American legal system, explore the function of case law and how it relates to other sources of the law, and learn to actively engage in case analysis. The class is graded pass/fail. (Required course) This course meets four days only and will run Monday, August 15th - Thursday August 18th. The day section will meet 9:00AM - 12:30PM and the evening section will meet 6:00PM - 9:30PM.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 1 View M,Tu,W,Th 9 AM-12:30 PM/Room. BLC A Day Julie Steiner
03 1 View M,Tu,W,Th 6 PM-9:30 PM/Room. BLC 3 Eve Julie Steiner
LAW 505 Criminal Law [Details]
LAW 505 Description

This course deals with the competing interests and policies that come into action when the individual clashes with society. The course also explores the underlying philosophical premises of various penal rules. The theories and purposes of punishment, the relationship between law and morality, definitions of criminal intent, principles of necessity, justification and excuse, and inchoate crime and group criminality may also be studied. (Required Course)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 4 View W 10:30 AM-11:40 AM/Room. BLC B,
Tu 10:30 AM-11:40 AM/Room. BLC B,
M 10:30 AM-11:30 AM/Room. BLC B
Day Bridgette Baldwin
LAW 507 Lawyering Skills I [Details]
LAW 507 Description

Lawyering Skills I is a required first-year course designed to introduce students to the essential problem-solving and communication skills of the legal profession. The legal research and writing faculty work closely with students in smaller classroom settings to introduce techniques of legal analysis, the basic sources and processes of legal research, and the principles of legal writing and oral advocacy. Through a series of assignments of increasing complexity, students learn how to analyze legal problems, research legal issues, frame legal arguments, and gain experience in drafting the major forms of predictive and persuasive legal writing. During the first semester, in Lawyering Skills I, students will be placed in the role of lawyer as advisor and counselor by focusing on predictive, advisory writing while learning other lawyering skills such as fact gathering and analysis, interviewing, and client counseling. Students will write legal memoranda, conduct interviews, draft professional emails and letters, and conduct office meetings, all in the context of completing practice based assignments. Students will receive individualized feedback throughout the semester. (required course; graded; 2 credits)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
10 2 View M,W 9:30 AM-10:20 AM/Room. BLC 3 Day Beth Cohen
11 2 View M,W 9:30 AM-10:20 AM/Room. BLC 1 Day Jeanne Kaiser
16 2 View W 1 PM-1:50 PM/Room. BLC 2,
M 2:10 PM-3 PM/Room. BLC 2
Day Jeanne Kaiser
17 2 View W 1 PM-1:50 PM/Room. BLC 1,
M 2:10 PM-3 PM/Room. BLC 1
Day Harris Freeman
18 2 View M,W 6 PM-6:50 PM/Room. BLC 3 Eve Harris Freeman
LAW 509 Civil Procedure [Details]
LAW 509 Description

The object of this course is to introduce students to the civil litigation process, including the attendant jurisdictional questions, court organization, and pleadings and rules of practice in state and federal courts. In addition, an analysis of the litigation process is undertaken, with emphasis on discovery, pretrial procedures, trial, judgment, and appellate review of the decision. (Required Course)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 4 View Th,F 9:30 AM-11:20 AM/Room. BLC A Day Bruce Miller
03 4 View W 7 PM-8:10 PM/Room. BLC 3,
Th 7:20 PM-8:30 PM/Room. BLC 3,
M 8:20 PM-9:20 PM/Room. BLC 3
Eve Arthur Wolf
LAW 511 Property [Details]
LAW 511 Description

Starting with the historical evolution of the concepts involved in real and personal property, this course will study the rights and duties of owners and possessors of property, priority of possession or property, and present and future interests in property. This course will also consider issues in landlord and tenant law, evidence of ownership or right to possession, methods of title assurance, commercial and noncommercial transfers of interests in property, the rescission, modification, interpretation and performance of transfer agreements and documents, and private controls on the use of property. This course may also explore conflicts between private ownership of property and community needs, the nature and purposes of types of shared ownership of property, and public controls on the use of property. (Required Course)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
03 4 View M,W 7:30 PM-9:20 PM/Room. BLC C Eve Erin Buzuvis
LAW 513 Torts [Details]
LAW 513 Description

This is a course concerning civil liability for harm inflicted on another. Topics studied may include negligent, reckless and intentional acts that inflict harm; defenses to claims of liability; the liability of owners or occupiers of land; and strict liability. (Required Course)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 4 View Tu,Th 1 PM-2:10 PM/Room. BLC A,
M 1 PM-2 PM/Room. BLC A
Day Julie Steiner
03 4 View Th 6 PM-7:10 PM/Room. BLC 3,
M 7 PM-8:10 PM/Room. BLC 3,
W 8:20 PM-9:20 PM/Room. BLC 3
Eve Barbara Noah
LAW 551 Business Organizations [Details]
LAW 551 Description

This course focuses on the fundamental conceptual framework of business organizations law including the formation and conduct of business in the partnership, corporate, and limited liability company forms. It provides an introduction to the terminology of business organizations and finance, and transmits some sense of what a business lawyer does. It also engages in questions of ethics, justice, professional responsibility and critical analysis of numerous aspects of business law. (Required Course)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
03 3 View M,W 6 PM-7:15 PM/Room. BLC C Eve Sudha Setty
LAW 553 Evidence [Details]
LAW 553 Description

This course is an introduction to the basic rules of evidence governing the proof of facts in criminal and civil trials, with a focus on the Federal Rules of Evidence. Topics covered may include the role of the judge and jury; relevance; hearsay and its exceptions; character evidence; and the competency, examination and impeachment of witnesses. Classroom method focuses on discussion of selected problems and cases and aims at providing all students with a common grounding in the basic rules of evidence. (Required Course)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 3 View M,W 10:30 AM-11:45 AM/Room. BLC C Day Anne Goldstein
LAW 555 Income Tax I [Details]
LAW 555 Description

A study of the codified law as it relates to the federal taxation of the income of individuals. This course emphasizes the concepts of gross income, taxable income, and deductions. Special emphasis is given to the federal tax policy considerations inherent in resolving tax issues. A survey of selected topics such as the tax consequences of divorce and administrative practice before the Internal Revenue Service and the Tax Court may be included in the course. (Required Course)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 3 View M,W 1 PM-2:15 PM/Room. BLC B Day William Metzger
03 3 View M,W 6:30 PM-7:45 PM/Room. BLC A Eve William Metzger
LAW 575 Professional Responsibility [Details]
LAW 575 Description

This course examines the ethics of lawyering and the various roles of the lawyer. We will discuss the nature and scope of the attorney's responsibilities and obligations to clients, society, the administration of justice, the profession, and the self. It covers legal and ethical standards and aspirations relevant to regulating the conduct of lawyers and the development of professional ethics. (Required Course)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
03 2 View Tu 6 PM-7:50 PM/Room. BLC A Eve Kevin O'Regan
LAW 599 Advanced Legal Analysis l [Details]
LAW 599 Description

This required course will introduce you to the bar exam, review material tested on the bar exam, and teach you important skills in reading, analyzing, and answering bar exam questions. The course uses a learn-by-doing approach. Written homework assignments include multiple choice questions and essay questions. These will be submitted, graded, and returned online before most classes and will then form the basis for class discussion and review. Students will also be assigned online video review. The course will refresh your recollection of selected topics within three of MBE subjects, Contracts, Evidence and Torts. Students will learn how the bar examiners test these topics and will learn how to study and to apply their knowledge to bar exam questions. The course is pass-fail, with the pass/fail determination based on 1) participation/ attendance and 2) performance. Students will receive feedback throughout the course. If a student fails as a result of performance, the student will receive a grade of incomplete and will be required to take the spring ALA 2 Course. Students will be given an initial assessment in August.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 2 View Tu 4 PM-5:50 PM/Room. BLC B Day Justin Dion
03 2 View M 6 PM-7:50 PM/Room. BLC B Eve Justin Dion
LAW 601 Electronic Discovery [Details]
LAW 601 Description

This course is an introduction to the legal and practical issues related to electronic discovery and the use of electronic evidence in legal proceedings. Attorneys engaged in litigation must ensure compliance with the rules and regulations governing the preservation and production of electronically stored information. Lawyers and clients nationwide are struggling with the practical challenges of electronic discovery and the law is continuously evolving. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of the legal rules governing ediscovery and develop practical knowledge and key analytical skills that can be used in practice.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
03 2 View W 6 PM-7:50 PM/Room. BLC 2 Eve Katie Winseck
LAW 603 International Criminal Law [Details]
LAW 603 Description

In this course we will discuss the application of domestic and international law to questions of jurisdiction over international criminal activities, international cooperation in criminal matters, substantive international law contained in multilateral treaties concerning war crimes and terrorism, and the permanent International Criminal Court. The course consists of a series of topics, organized around the principles and offenses of international criminal law, including: nature and sources of international criminal law; nature and elements of responsibility and defenses against responsibility; basis of jurisdictional competence of states under international law; methods for obtaining persons abroad; attempts over time, including through international tribunals, to secure punishment for international crimes; offenses against peace; war crimes; crimes against humanity; genocide; terrorism; and the intersection between international crimes and human rights.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 3 View Tu,Th 10:30 AM-11:45 AM/Room. BLC F Day Matthew Charity
LAW 611 White Collar Crime [Details]
LAW 611 Description

This course offers an overview of the law of business (white collar) crime. Topics include: individual and corporate responsibility for malfeasance; complicity; conspiracy; mail fraud; public corruption; RICO; securities fraud; perjury and false statements; obstruction of justice; the 5th amendment protections for business speech and documents. Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, LAW 551 Business Organizations and LAW 505 Criminal Law are prerequisites to enrollment in this course. This course satisfies 1 Unit of Skills.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 3 View M,W 4 PM-5:15 PM/Room. BLC 2 Day Anne Goldstein
LAW 629 Gender & the Law [Details]
LAW 629 Description

This course examines issues of gender in the law from the standpoint of feminist legal jurisprudence, particularly the way it is affected by and constructs gender in our society. Topics may include the law of sexual harassment, sexual autonomy and reproductive choice, workplace discrimination, legal regulation of welfare and low-income women, and the way in which a legal definition of sex (or the lack of it) influences law and social policy. (QWC Optional)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 3 View M,W 1 PM-2:15 PM/Room. BLC 3 Day Jennifer Levi
LAW 632 Law Office Management [Details]
LAW 632 Description

This course will introduce students to the operation and management of solo practice, law firms, and corporate legal departments. Practices and techniques that assist in the ethical, professional, and profitable representation of clients while reducing stress and crisis situations will be presented through presentations, readings, and guest lecturers. Topics to be covered include: business planning; time management, accounting and billing; client recruitment and relations; technology and office systems; stress management and personal support; ethical responsibilities and professionalism.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
03 2 View Th 6 PM-7:50 PM/Room. BLC B Eve Michael Agen
LAW 639 Special Education Law [Details]
LAW 639 Description

This course will provide an overview of the legal rights of public school students identified with special education needs and the responsibilities of school districts to meet those needs. Issues to be addressed will include: eligibility and evaluation of students, team meetings, individualized educational plans, placements, discipline, transition services, and due process hearings. Legal principles governing special education will be explored through cases decided by the courts and the Massachusetts Bureau of Special Education Appeals. Rights and responsibilities under the anti-discrimination law known as Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 will also be addressed.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 2 View Tu 4 PM-5:50 PM/Room. BLC 1 Day Claire Thompson
LAW 643 Family Law [Details]
LAW 643 Description

This course examines the relationship between family and law. Topics addressed include legal definitions of "family" taking into consideration both the marital and non-marital family; rights and obligatons among family members; the federal and state government's role in family life as well as the constitutional limits on government involvement; dissolution of family including issues of property distribution, alimony/support, and the implications of children; jurisdiction; and the role of the attorney in family formation and disputes.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 3 View M,W 9 AM-10:15 AM/Room. BLC C Day Jennifer Levi
LAW 664 Elder Law [Details]
LAW 664 Description

This course will follow the course of a typical elder law representation. Initially, the course introduces students to the social, emotional, family, and financial contexts of aging. Thereafter, the course prepares students to identify the client, define the representation, plan for incapacity, anticipate nursing home care and eligibility for benefits, and design an appropriate estate plan. Topics of special focus will include: ethical issues specific to the practice of elder law, client capacity, health care proxies and guardianship, powers of attorney and conservatorship, nursing home institutionalization, planning for Medicaid eligibility, and estate planning. Other topics to be discussed will include estate, gift, and income tax issues, Medicare coverage for long-term care, Veteran's benefits for long-term care, and creating and maintaining an elder law practice.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
03 2 View W 6 PM-7:50 PM/Room. BLC 1 Eve Elizabeth Lovejoy
LAW 671 Higher Education Law [Details]
LAW 671 Description

Colleges and universities are unique communities of faculty, students, and staff that teach, learn, work, and, often, live together. The law of higher education engages policies and legal principles of general application as well as those specifically tailored to this special environment. This course will examine legal issues that surface at colleges and universities with particular emphasis on legal counsel?s considerations in addressing them. Areas to be covered include rights and responsibilities of the educational institution; academic freedom and faculty rights; student rights and responsibilities; Title IX and sexual harassment; nondiscrimination and affirmative action; and athletics and the student athlete.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 2 View W 10:20 AM-12:10 PM/Room. BLC 329 Day Paul Murphy
LAW 674 Employment Discrimination [Details]
LAW 674 Description

This course concerns discrimination in the workplace, with emphasis on different theories of discrimination and the application of those theories in a variety of settings. The primary focus is on the text and interpretation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended in 1991. Other areas studied may include the Age Discrimination Act of 1967, the Equal Pay Act of 1963, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 3 View M,W 2:30 PM-3:45 PM/Room. BLC C Day Erin Buzuvis
LAW 675 Legal Aspects of Entrepreneurship [Details]
LAW 675 Description

This course provides law students with legal practical tools relating to entrepreneurship, including theory, resources and templates for various agreements that they can refer to in their legal careers. The course is structured to link key learning objectives to one or more real life based hypothetical fact patterns of business experiences in order to emphasize the practicality and applications of the learning objectives. The course includes traditional analysis and briefing of case law and statutes. The course also includes interactive team activities such as a mock negotiation of licensing and settlement agreements and drafting of agreements relating thereto. The course covers an introduction to business entities; legal aspects of marketing; ownership of ideas, technology and intellectual property; trade secrets; licensing agreements, proposals in response to Requests for Quotations (RFQ); distributorship agreements and litigated case studies.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
03 2 View Tu 8 PM-9:50 PM/Room. BLC A Eve John Mutchler
LAW 685 Bankruptcy [Details]
LAW 685 Description

Recommended for those who intend to practice commercial law in any form, this course constitutes an overview of both consumer and business chapters of the United States Bankruptcy Code. Students are exposed to the perspectives of both debtors and creditors in the bankruptcy liquidation and /or reorganization process.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 3 View Tu,Th 2:30 PM-3:45 PM/Room. BLC B Day Henry Boroff
LAW 688 Bioethics [Details]
LAW 688 Description

This is a survey course that will cover a variety of bioethics topics through the lenses of law, ethics, medicine, and public policy. Topics may include reproductive technologies and rights, medical decision-making, end of life care, distributive justice topics, and research on human subjects.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 3 View M,W 4 PM-5:15 PM/Room. BLC 1 Day Barbara Noah
LAW 695 Academic Success Workshop [Details]
LAW 695 Description

Academic Success Program skills workshops are open to all interested students. The workshops cover essential law school skills such as note-taking, briefing cases, outlining, and exam-taking techniques. All students are encouraged to attend.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 0 View Tu 9:30 AM-10:20 AM/Room. BLC B Day Myra Orlen
02 0 View Th 2:30 PM-3:20 PM/Room. BLC A Day Myra Orlen
03 0 View Th 5 PM-5:50 PM/Room. BLC 3 Eve Myra Orlen
LAW 696 Landlord & Tenant [Details]
LAW 696 Description

This course focuses on the landlord-tenant relationship in the residental rental market with emphasis on recent court decisions and various selected state laws that have attempted to lessen the problems of substandard or inadequate rental housing, housing discrimination, problems of lead paint poisoning, and related issues. Eviction proceedings, discrimination litigation and consumer remedies are covered in detail. Enrollment is limited to 45 students. Prerequisite: LAW 511 Property.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
03 2 View Tu 8 PM-9:50 PM/Room. BLC B Eve James Donnelly
LAW 702 Products Liability [Details]
LAW 702 Description

This course presents an analysis and discussion of the American law of products liability. The focus of the course is on the major theories of liability with respect to injuries caused by the use of defective consumer products. We will cover the requirements of each of the major causes of action in product litigation, together with appropriate defenses and damages related to those causes of action.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
03 2 View M 8 PM-9:50 PM/Room. BLC 2 Eve Alex Grant
LAW 722 Estate & Gift Tax [Details]
LAW 722 Description

This course is a study of the fundamental principles of federal taxation on property transfers at death and during the life of the transferor, including those transfers in contemplation of death, and those with life estates retained and retention of power to control. Consideration is also given to the martial deduction, the tax effects on various types of property transfers, and the generation-skipping tax. Prerequisite: Law 511 Property.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
03 3 View Tu,Th 6 PM-7:15 PM/Room. BLC C Eve Frederick Royal
LAW 727 Juvenile Justice [Details]
LAW 727 Description

This course concentrates on juvenile delinquency proceedings from pretrial procedure through trial and the occasional transfers of juvenile offenders to the adult criminal system. Developments in the area of due process for young people (United States Supreme Court cases) and effective client advocacy are stressed. Prerequisite: Law 505 Criminal Law.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
03 2 View Tu 6 PM-7:50 PM/Room. BLC B Eve Scott Chapman
LAW 740 Taxation of Business Entities [Details]
LAW 740 Description

This course focuses on the federal income tax treatment of corporations, Subchapter S corporations, partnerships and limited liability companies. The course will compare and contrast the federal income tax treatment of the different entities. Areas of study will include tax consequences from the formation of the entity; from the operation of the entity; from retirement or death of an owner; from the redemption of an owner's interest by the entity; and from the liquidation or sale of the entity. 3 Credits. Income Tax I is a prerequisite.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 3 View Tu,Th 1 PM-2:15 PM/Room. BLC 3 Day Frederick Royal
LAW 746 Secured Transactions [Details]
LAW 746 Description

Secured Transactions is an intensive study of consensual security interests in personal property under Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code, including their creation, priority and enforcement. Students will be exposed to issues surrounding repossession and foreclosure of security interests, and the effect of Article 9 security interests on conflicting judicial and statutory tax liens, leases and fixtures. The course will also offer side-glances at letters of credit under Article 5 of the UCC and limited provisions of the federal Bankruptcy Code.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 3 View Tu,Th 10:30 AM-11:45 AM/Room. BLC 3 Day Henry Boroff
LAW 748 Trusts & Estates [Details]
LAW 748 Description

This course is a study of the inter-vivos and testamentary gratuitous transfer of property, including intestate succession, wills, and trusts. Also discussed are the duties and liability of the fiduciary, the use of charitable donations, and the raising of constructive and resulting trusts. Prerequisite: Law 511 Property

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 3 View Tu,Th 1 PM-2:15 PM/Room. BLC C Day Mark Worthington
LAW 758 Post-Conviction Rights & Procedures [Details]
LAW 758 Description

This course will examine state and federal rights and procedures to which a state criminal defendant is entitled after conviction. Topics will include state direct appeals, collateral challenges to convictions, and challenges to state convictions in federal court. Areas of study will also include applicable standards of appellate review, preservation and exhaustion doctrines, and raising constitutional issues during post-conviction proceedings. Prerequisite: Law 501 Constitutional Law.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 2 View Th 2:30 PM-4:20 PM/Room. BLC E Day Anne Goldstein
LAW 950 Law Review Staff [Details]
LAW 950 Description

Students who are staff members of Law Review are required to attend the mandatory weekly Law Review staff meeting for both the fall and spring semesters. Staff members of Law Review receive 2 credits in the fall and 1 credit in the spring for the successful completion of their Law Review Staff year. Law Review staff will receive 2 writing units in the fall and 1 writing unit in the spring.)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
02 2 View M 5 PM-6 PM Eve Harris Freeman
LAW 954 Law Review Board [Details]
LAW 954 Description

Students who are Board members of Law Review are required to attend the mandatory weekly Law Review staff meeting for both the fall and spring semesters. Board members of the Law Review receive between 2 and 6 credits per year, depending on their position on the Law Review. The Associate Dean must approve departures from these semester credit allocations.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 1 View M 5 PM-6 PM Eve Harris Freeman
02 2 View M 4 PM-5 PM Day Harris Freeman
03 3 View M 4 PM-5 PM Day Harris Freeman
LAW 960 Labor & Employment [Details]
LAW 960 Description

This course is an introduction to the seminal federal and state laws establishing the rights of employees and the legal responsibilities of employers. The course begins with the socio-legal context for the development of workplace rights during the industrial revolution and quickly moves to an in-depth discussion of the National Labor Relations Act and exemplary state laws governing the right to form labor unions and engage in collective bargaining in the private and public sectors. Next, the course introduces wage and hour law protections of the Fair Labor Standards Act, the fundamental principles of employment discrimination in Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, and key common law principles and state laws governing workers' compensation and unemployment. Special attention is paid to marginalized workers and new forms of employment in the 21st century workplace, i.e., the "gig economy", immigrant workers' rights, efforts to protect workers from factory closings and job loss; free speech rights and privacy in the workplace, and; the challenge of workplace law keeping pace with major shifts that have restructured employment and labor markets. This course satisfies 3 writing units.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
03 3 View M,W 8 PM-9:15 PM/Room. BLC A Eve Harris Freeman
LAW 961 Nat. Security & Gov. Accountability [Details]
LAW 961 Description

This seminar considers several intertwined themes: the government?s need for secrecy in counterterrorism matters and how that has been used to justify a profound lack of transparency over national security law and policy; the responses to that executive branch secrecy by Congress, the courts, and the public; and the impact of a lack of transparency and government accountability on individual rights, the rule of law, and democratic norms. The course focuses on the three post-September 11 U.S. presidential administrations, analyzing how each administration managed (or is managing) the question of government transparency with regard to national security, and then examining congressional and judicial responses with regard to the security issues at the forefront during each administration. The course also considers comparative jurisdictions that deal with similar issues of security, transparency and accountability. Finally, the course considers the specific context of personal privacy in the age of national security surveillance, and how privacy has been affected by both substantive national security policy and a lack of transparency over that policy. In contextualizing national security secrecy in the debate over personal privacy, we consider whether the usual ordering in a liberal democracy?of a government limited by law and a citizenry with the right to limit what the government does?has been distorted in ways that undermine the rule of law. This seminar has no final exam. Students will be graded on written work (including a research paper), class participation, and end-of-semester presentations.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 2 View M 2:30 PM-4:20 PM/Room. BLC F Day Sudha Setty
LAW 962 Comparative Corporate Law [Details]
LAW 962 Description

All modern industrialized countries have developed a business entity similar to the device we call a corporation." The legal systems in those countries must to deal with the challenges that corporation-like entities present. For example, in the rich nexus of interests that surround a collective enterprise like a corporation, the interests of management may conflict with the interests of owners; majority owners may have different interests than those of minority shareholders; and others, be they the state, employees, creditors, or society at large, may have interests that conflict with the corporation's goals.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 2 View M 10:20 AM-12:10 PM/Room. BLC F Day Eric Gouvin
LAWS617 Criminal Pre-Trial Practice [Details]
LAWS617 Description

This course is aimed at developing student written and oral advocacy skills in the pre-trial phase of criminal litigation. The course will concentrate on the pre-trial stages of a hypothetical criminal case. The course will allow students to work on this case from the pre-trial conference up to jury selection. Students will brief and argue typical evidentiary and discovery motions arising prior to trial. The course will also address pre-trial strategies and preparation, including motions in limine, and jury instructions. At the end of the term students will present oral arguments on motions to suppress statements, identification and evidence. The course will require at least 4 hours of preparation per session. Class attendance is mandatory. Enrollment is limited to 16 students. (This is a simulation course and satisfies 2 experiential learning credits.)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 2 View Tu 1 PM-2:50 PM/Room. MTCT Day Tina Cafaro
LAWS681 Trial Methods [Details]
LAWS681 Description

This course utilizes a clinical approach to trial advocacy. Emphasis is given to the two complementary abilities necessary for effective trial advocacy - preparation and execution. Students will learn effective methods for analyzing and preparing a case for trial. In addition, students will practice the technical skills necessary to present their side of a case persuasively during a trial, including tactics and strategy in the courtroom, opening statements and closing arguments, examination of witnesses, admission and exclusion of evidence, questions of burden of proof, and preservation of rights on appeal. Prerequisite: LAW 553, Evidence. Enrollment limited to 20 students per section. (This is a simulation course and satisfies 2 experiential learning credits.)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
03 2 View Th 6 PM-7:50 PM/Room. MTCT Eve Tina Page
LAWS728 Mediation [Details]
LAWS728 Description

This course will provide training in both the theory and methodology of divorce and family mediation and essential mediation skills. The class is interactive, and students will have the opportunity, in almost every class to practice mediation skills. A basic understanding of Massachusetts divorce law and/or entry level family law course is strongly recommended. Some states, by statute or rule of court, set standards for court-based mediators. Massachusetts requires basic mediation training and professional practice under the supervision of a community-based mediation program before practitioners may serve as court-based mediators. This is a basic mediation course that qualifies successful students for an internship or practicum in a community dispute resolution program for supervised practice and for advanced mediation training. Mediators develop their skills through a lifetime of practice. This is the first step. Enrollment limited to 18 students. (This is a simulation course and satisfies 3 experiential learning credits.)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
03 3 View W 5 PM-7:50 PM/Room. BLC B Eve Oran Kaufman
LAWS753 Interviewing , Counseling & Neg [Details]
LAWS753 Description

This course will focus on developing an understanding of counseling your law client and negotiating for your client. In-class simulations will provide students an opportunity to apply concepts in interactive situation, both to reinforce their understanding of process and to allow an opportunity to develop an informed but personal approach. Class attendance and participation are mandatory. Students who have taken or are taking LAW 769, Negotiation, Mediation and Arbitration, or Law 609 Negotiation: Strategies and Practice may not enroll in this course. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
03 2 View W 8 PM-9:50 PM/Room. BLC B Eve Peter Vickery
LAWS769 Negotiation,Mediation & Arbitration [Details]
LAWS769 Description

This course will focus on negotiation and other methods of dispute resolution, with emphasis on negotiated settlement, mediation and arbitration. Negotiation theory and alternative tactics and strategies will be examined, with focus on practical skills by way of example and simulated exercises. Various methods of alternative dispute resolution will be discussed in the context of different areas of legal practice and substantive law. Students will participate in both a simulated negotiation and a simulated mediation. In addition, the course will cover the arbitration process from both a substantive law and practical skills standpoint. Students will have an elective opportunity to write an Arbitrator's Decision and Award as their final paper, based upon the evidentiary submissions in an actual case. Enrollment is limited to 20 students. Students who have taken LAW 609 Negotiation: Strategies & Practice may not enroll in this course. (This is a simulation course and satisfies 2 experiential learning credits.)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
02 2 View W 10 AM-11:50 AM/Room. BLC 2 Day Nancy Sykes
LAWS806 Judicial Externship Seminar [Details]
LAWS806 Description

This course is the seminar component that accompanies the first judicial externship placement that a student has been selected for through the externship application process. Seminar assignments and readings are designed to complement the individual work experience by providing structured reflection on many aspects of the roles of courts, judges and lawyers in society. Students are also required to maintain weekly time sheets and journals and complete a Learning Agenda. (This course satisfies 1 experiential learning credit.)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
10 1 View M 4 PM-4:50 PM/Room. BLC 3 Day Beth Cohen
LAWS807 Judicial Externship [Details]
LAWS807 Description

Students work 12-15 hours a week for a total of 168 semester hours engaging in a variety of legal work under the supervision of a judge. Students may not receive compensation for work done in an Externship. Externships include varied levels of research, writing, and observation depending on the student's placement. Students may take no more than three externships during law school. Students enrolled in their first externship must also concurrently enroll in a one-credit seminar, with their semester of fieldwork. Prerequisites: An externship is open to students who have successfully completed 28 hours of law studies. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship. (This course satisfies 3 experiential learning credits.)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
10 3 View BA - TBA Beth Cohen
LAWS808 Law Practice Externship [Details]
LAWS808 Description

Students work 12-15 hours a week for a total of 168 semester hours engaging in a variety of legal work under the supervision of an attorney in a public interest, government service, or private sector externship placement. Students may not receive compensation for work done in an Externship. Externships develop students' lawyering skills through participation in activities such as legal research and writing, client interviewing and counseling, factual investigation, development and implementation of case theory and strategy, negotiation, mediation, litigation and other forms of advocacy. Students may take no more than three externships during law school. Students enrolled in their first externship must also concurrently enroll in a one-credit seminar, with their semester of fieldwork. Prerequisites: An externship is open to students who have successfully completed 28 hours of law studies. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship. (This course satisfies 3 experiential learning credits.)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
10 3 View BA - TBA Beth Cohen
LAWS809 Law Practice Externship Seminar [Details]
LAWS809 Description

This course is the seminar component that accompanies the first public interest, government service, or private sector externship placement that a student has been selected for through the externship application process. Seminar assignments and readings are designed to complement the individual work experience by providing structured reflection on many aspects of the roles of courts, judges and lawyers in society. Students are also required to maintain weekly time sheets and journals and complete a Learning Agenda. (This course satisfies 1 experiential learning credit.)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
10 1 View M 4 PM-4:50 PM/Room. BLC 3 Day Beth Cohen
LAWS910 Legal Services: Skills Seminar [Details]
LAWS910 Description

This seminar is a prerequisite for selected students participating in the Legal Services Clinic. Students enroll in this course the semester preceding their clinic placement. The course focuses on substantive law and issues related to poverty law practice, and developing basic lawyering skills, including professionalism and ethics, client interviewing, counseling, case planning, fact investigation, oral advocacy, negotiation and litigation skills. (This course satisfies 2 experiential learning credits.)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 2 View Tu 4 PM-5:50 PM/Room. Clinic Day Gordon Shaw
LAWS916 Legal Services Clinic [Details]
LAWS916 Description

Selected students work in the office of Community Legal Aid (CLA), a local non-profit organization charged with providing free civil legal services to low-income and elderly persons. Under the supervision of CLA attorneys, students assume primary professional responsibility for actual cases, including client interviews, counseling, case development, negotiation, and representation of clients in court and administrative proceedings. Students are expected to commit 16 hours per week to the fieldwork at CLA. Students enrolled in LAWS 916 must also concurrently enroll in LAWS 917, a one-credit seminar, with their semester of fieldwork. Prerequisites: Successful completion of LAWS 910 Legal Service Skills Seminar and LAW 553 Evidence. Evidence may be taken concurrently with the Clinic. A student is required to be SJC Rule 3:03 eligible. The clinic is open to students who have successfully completed 28 hours of law studies. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship. (This course satisfies 4 experiential learning credits.)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 4 View BA - TBA Gordon Shaw
LAWS917 Legal Services Clinic Seminar [Details]
LAWS917 Description

In addition to the fieldwork, Legal Services Clinic students attend a regularly scheduled seminar meeting. This concurrent seminar will serve as a forum for reflection on the fieldwork, case review, and other topics. Prerequisites: LAWS910 Legal Service Skills and LAW 553 Evidence (Evidence may be taken concurrently). (This course and satisfies 1 experiential learning credit.)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 1 View F 9:30 AM-10:20 AM Day Gordon Shaw
LAWS920 Criminal Law Prosecution Clinic [Details]
LAWS920 Description

Selected students in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic work as student assistant district attorneys within the Hampden County District Attorney's Office. By court rule, students in the Clinic are authorized to practice in any District Court case, which includes a mix of both misdemeanors and felonies. Typical of the offenses litigated by students in the District Court are possession and/or distribution of controlled substances, domestic violence offenses including assault and battery, assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, and violation of a restraining order, larceny, assault and battery on a police officer, and driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs. During the course of the semester, a student attorney will appear in three different sessions of the District Court: the arraignment session (in which students represent the Commonwealth in bail hearings), the motion session (in which students prepare and litigate oppositions to motions to suppress and motions to dismiss) and, ultimately, the trial session (in which a student prepare and litigate jury and jury-waived trials). This clinic allows students to gain substantial exposure over the course of the semester to the entire process of litigating a criminal case. Students enrolled in LAWS920 must also concurrently enroll in LAWS 921, a two-credit seminar, with their semester of fieldwork. Prerequisites: LAW 553 Evidence and LAW 706 Criminal Procedure Investigation. Enrollment is limited to selected third-year full time and forth-year part time students. No student may maintain outside legal employment while participating in this clinic. All students will be CORI/criminal records checked by the District Attorney's Office. A student is required to be SJC Rule 3:03 eligible. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship. (This course satisfies 4 experiential learning credits.)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 4 View BA - TBA Tina Cafaro
LAWS921 Criminal Law Prosecution Seminar [Details]
LAWS921 Description

In addition to the fieldwork, there is a classroom component which operates as a combination seminar/simulation. This part of the course is quite intensive for the first three or four weeks of the semester as well as the week prior to the start of classes. Students must attend a two day orientation the week before classes begin; no exceptions will be made to this mandatory orientation. Following this initial training period, the class will meet at a designated time for a two-hour session on a weekly basis for the balance of the semester. (This course satisfies 2 experiential learning credits.)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 2 View Tu 9 AM-10:50 AM/Room. MTCT Day Tina Cafaro
LAWS924 Immigration Clinic [Details]
LAWS924 Description

Selected students work in the office of the Central West Justice Center (CWJC) a subsidiary of Community Legal Aid), a private, non-profit organization that provides civil legal assistance to poor people and elders. Under the supervision of CWJC staff attorneys, students will work on humanitarian immigration cases, including applications for asylum for individuals fleeing persecution, Special Immigrant Juvenile Status for abused, neglected, and abandoned children, relief under the Violence against Women Act for survivors of domestic violence, and U visas for crime victims. Students will interview clients and witnesses, prepare affidavits, assist in gathering documentary evidence, and research and write legal memoranda. Students may also conduct intake interviews with clients at community clinics. Students are expected to commit 16 hours a week to the fieldwork at CWJC for two sequential semesters. Students must enroll in a concurrent seminar during the first semester of the clinic. Prerequisites: Successful completion of 28 hours of law studies. Students must have successfully completed or be concurrently enrolled in LAW 553 Evidence. A student is required to be SJC Rule 3:03 eligible. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship. (4 experiential learning credits for each semester; total of 8 experiential learning credits for both semesters.)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 4 View BA - TBA Gordon Shaw
LAWS925 Immigration Clinic Seminar [Details]
LAWS925 Description

In addition to the fieldwork, Immigration Clinic students attend a regularly scheduled weekly seminar meeting concurrent with their first semester of field placement. The seminar will meet for 50 minutes each week during the semester, and will serve as a forum for reflection on the fieldwork component, case review, and other topics. During the second semester, students will continue to engage in guided reflection. However, there will be no concurrent seminar. (1 experiential learning credit) Restricted Withdrawal: This clinic is considered a Restricted Withdrawal Course. A student who withdraws from this clinic course 30 days prior to the start of the semester shall receive a ?W? on their transcript.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 1 View F 9:30 AM-10:20 AM Day Gordon Shaw
LAWS944 Small Business Clinic [Details]
LAWS944 Description

The Small Business Clinic will provide selected students with the opportunity to handle legal matters for small business clients under the supervision of the professor. Students work on transactional legal matters that are typical in the start-up phase of a business. The goal of the clinic is to expose students to the methodology and mindset of business lawyering. Law students work with the entrepreneurs to identify the legal issues new businesses confront. Clinic students participate in weekly one-on-one meetings with the professor, meetings with clients (often in the evenings) and participation in walk-in legal assistance. The clinical component will involve client interviewing, assessment and intake, along with legal research, drafting, and counseling as the situation requires. In an effort to operate the clinic as close to an actual law firm as possible, students are required to maintain client billing records through use of the clinic?s time/document management software. Client work will require a minimum of 16 hours of work per week and other course commitments will require an additional four to five hours per week. Students enrolled in LAWS944 must also concurrently enroll in LAWS 945, a two-credit seminar, with their semester of fieldwork. Prerequisites: LAW 551 Business Organizations, Law 553 Evidence. Evidence may be taken concurrently with the Clinic. A student is required to be SJC Rule 3:03 eligible. The clinic is open to students who have successfully completed 28 hours of law studies. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship. (This course satisfies 4 experiential learning credits.)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
03 4 View BA - TBA Robert Statchen
LAWS945 Small Business Seminar [Details]
LAWS945 Description

In addition to the fieldwork, Small Business Clinic students attend a regularly scheduled weekly seminar meeting. Students are expected to attend two full days of a mandatory orientation prior to the start of the semester. The weekly seminar incorporates business and legal practitioners from the local area. (This course satisfies 2 experiential learning credits.)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
03 2 View Tu 6 PM-7:50 PM/Room. BLC 3 Eve Robert Statchen
QWC 656 Consumer Protection [Details]
QWC 656 Description

The organization of the course is transactional: it first examines problems in the formation of consumer transactions, then moves to the substance of the deal and concludes with remedies. At each stage of the transaction, the first inquiry is whether any intervention on behalf of consumers is warranted. The second inquiry is concerned with the extent to which intervention impacts upon the freedom of contract and the rights of the parties concerned, including the cost of such intervention. Enrollment Limited to 20 Students (Satisfies 3 Writing Units)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
03 3 View Tu,Th 8 PM-9:15 PM/Room. BLC 1 Eve Justin Dion
QWC 678 Legal Writing & Analysis [Details]
QWC 678 Description

This limited-enrollment, two-credit course is designed to provide in-depth training in legal reasoning for law school exams, the bar exam, and legal practice. This course is intended to benefit students who wish to improve their legal analysis skills; improve their exam performance; and prepare for bar-related performance exams. The course will encourage students to learn how to apply substantive law in the context of performance tests. This course addresses how to prepare for and take essay and performance exams; prepare a course study outline; synthesize and formulate a rule of law from one or more legal authorities; place a rule in a rule-structure; analyze application of the rule to a set of facts; and organize legal discussion of that analysis. Students will receive guidance and feedback on all written work from the professor about ways to improve their legal reasoning skills. The final grade is based on two performance exams and other small projects, assignments, and quizzes. (Limit to 16) (This course satisfies 2 writing units.)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 2 View W 2:30 PM-4:20 PM/Room. BLC 3 Day Myra Orlen
QWC 706 Crim Pro:Investigation [Details]
QWC 706 Description

This course examines the constitutional limits on police investigations. The course focuses primarily on the development of federal constitutional law (4th, 5th, and 6th amendments) in the United States Supreme Court as a way to balance society's need for effective law enforcement against the rights of individuals to be free from unreasonable searches and seizures, coercive interrogations, and unfair pretrial identification procedures. Completion of Law 796 Criminal Procedure: Adjudication is not a prerequisite to enrollment in this course. Students taking this course may not enroll in LAW 784 Criminal Procedure: Survey. This course satisfies 2 writing units .

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 3 View M,W 2:30 PM-3:45 PM/Room. BLC B Day Bridgette Baldwin
QWC 716 First Amendment Rights [Details]
QWC 716 Description

This class will provide an overview of the doctrine governing the First Amendment of the United States Constitution. In addition, the course will involve class simulation and writing projects focused on specific areas of First Amendment jurisprudence, including the speech rights of public school students and the rights of public employees to speak on matters of public concern. This class satisfies 2 writing units.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
02 2 View Th 4 PM-5:50 PM/Room. BLC A Day Jeanne Kaiser
QWC 762 International Law [Details]
QWC 762 Description

This course provides an overview of public international law with a focus on the framework and development of international law. We will examine how the doctrines, institutions and methodologies of international law have developed in recent years, with attention to the application of those doctrines and methodologies to legal aspects of current international controversies. We will also discuss the structure, goals, processes and institutions of international law, with detailed consideration of issues such as the sources of international law, the recognition and responsibility of states, and the role of organizations, corporations, and individuals in the application of international law. (This course satisfies 1 Writing Unit.)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 3 View Tu,Th 2:30 PM-3:45 PM/Room. BLC F Day Matthew Charity
QWCS640 Federal Income Tax Simulation [Details]
QWCS640 Description

This course is designed to provide two-person teams of students with the opportunity to engage in research and writing in the context of solving a tax problem which might arise in everyday tax practice. Each team will be required to prepare a detailed outline of tax issues raised by the problem, three drafts of a memorandum of law to a senior partner and two drafts of a client letter, explaining their analysis, conclusions and recommendations for client action. Students will also be required to keep detailed time sheets. Teams will meet with the instructor at regular, mutually agreed upon times. The course may utilize the tax problem which is the subject of the ABA Section of Taxation Law Student Tax Challenge competition, in which case teams may submit their work product to that competition by the deadline date set by that competition (before the second week of November). Prerequisite: Law 555, Income Tax I and Law 747, Income Tax II. Enrollment is by two-person teams of students and is limited to 8 teams. Enrollment limited to 16 students. (This is a simulation course and satisfies 3 experiential learning credits or 3 writing units.)

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 3 View BA - TBA Frederick Royal
QWCS792 International Human Rights [Details]
QWCS792 Description

International Human Rights is a simulation course that offers students the opportunity to develop their lawyering skills (such as research, analysis, writing, and oral presentation), as well as to learn substantive law. Using hypothetical cases (based on real events) that are pending in domestic or international courts, the course examines recent advances in international human rights. Topics explored include guarantees against gender discrimination, protecting privacy, and advancing the interests of refugees. Students play the roles of American attorneys and international agents (i.e., attorneys) involved in human rights disputes. They develop strategy, analyze legal materials, prepare briefs and memorials, and present oral arguments on behalf of their clients (states, organizations, and individuals) in domestic and international courts. The final grade for the course is based entirely on the oral and written work. This course satisfies 3 writing or 3 experiential learning credits.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 3 View M,W 1 PM-2:15 PM/Room. BLC C Day Arthur Wolf
QWCS797 Federal Litigation PreTrial Phase [Details]
QWCS797 Description

This course is aimed at refining students' written and oral advocacy skills in the pretrial phase of litigaton. In weekly exercises, students will brief and argue typical motions arising prior to trial. The course will also address pretrial strategy, both in preparing pleadings, planning discovery and drafting motions. At the end of the term, students will draft a larger memorandum and present a more extensive oral argument on a motion for summary judgement or to dismiss. The course will require at least four to six hours of preparation for each session. Class attendance is mandatory. Enrollment limited to 16 students. This is a simulation course and satisfies 3 writing units or 3 experiential learning credits.

Sections
Section. Credits. Books. Time/Location D/E Professor.
01 3 View W 2:30 PM-5:20 PM/Room. MTCT Day Mark Mastroianni

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